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i am mine

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i know i was born and i know that i'll die, the in between is mine.

teachingliteracy:

A calendar made from tea, one cup per day. 

— 1 year ago with 782 notes
#design  #experience  #stuff 

Wound closure techniques ca. 1855.
Fig 1. Closure of the wound without sutures, using adhesives and cloth.Fig 2. Simple interrupted suture.Fig 3. Simple uninterrupted suture.Fig 4. Interfolded suture, with stabilizing rods. Suture passes under wound and is pulled together despite no stitches over the wound site.Fig 5. “Suture en zigzags” - Continuous horizontal mattress suture.Fig 6. Twisted suture. Dieffenbach used this stitch in the early steps of his reconstructive surgery.Fig 7. Suture needle holder.Fig 8. Curved suture needles.
Précis iconographique de Médecine Opératoire et d’Anatomie Chirurgicale. Drs. Bernard and Huette, 1854.

Wound closure techniques ca. 1855.

Fig 1. Closure of the wound without sutures, using adhesives and cloth.
Fig 2. Simple interrupted suture.
Fig 3. Simple uninterrupted suture.
Fig 4. Interfolded suture, with stabilizing rods. Suture passes under wound and is pulled together despite no stitches over the wound site.
Fig 5. “Suture en zigzags” - Continuous horizontal mattress suture.
Fig 6. Twisted suture. Dieffenbach used this stitch in the early steps of his reconstructive surgery.
Fig 7. Suture needle holder.
Fig 8. Curved suture needles.

Précis iconographique de Médecine Opératoire et d’Anatomie Chirurgicale. Drs. Bernard and Huette, 1854.

(Source: biomedicalephemera, via synaloepha)

— 1 year ago with 6116 notes
#stuff  #drawing 
teachingliteracy:

Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off.
by Monica Gifford

teachingliteracy:

Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off.

by Monica Gifford

— 2 years ago with 336 notes
#stuff